newsletter

Spring 2017
Clinical Trial Update
Neuro-Spinal Scaffold May Improve Condition Of Patients With Complete Paralysis

Six of 11 patients enrolled in the clinical study of the Neuro-Spinal Scaffold have had an AIS upgrade in their spinal cord injury. Neurosurgeon Dom Coric, MD, of our practice is a co-principal investigator for this study.

Dom Coric. MD
"With this study and others in progress at our practice, Carolina Neurosurgery & Spine Associates continues to take a leadership role in the advancement of the neurosciences and the treatment modalities available to patients with brain and spine disorders," said Dr. Coric.

One of our patients enrolled in the study improved from a complete AIS A spinal cord injury to an incomplete AIS B spinal cord injury in the time between discharge and the one-month evaluation. The device was implanted by Dr. Coric and Samuel Chewning, MD, of our practice.

Dr. Coric and Michael Fehlings, MD, PhD, of Toronto Western Hospital presented these study findings at the Spine Summit 2017 in Las Vegas in March.

This pilot clinical research study sponsored by Invivo Therapeutic Corporation is designed to evaluate the safety and initial effectiveness of the Neuro-Spinal Scaffold device, which may help advance the clinical science of treating patients with devastating spinal cord injuries.

The device is a highly porous, polymeric cylinder designed to spare spinal cord tissue and decrease post-traumatic cyst formation and spinal cord tissue pressure. It is biodegradable and designed to be absorbed by the body in six to 12 weeks. The Neuro-Spinal Scaffold is investigational and is not approved by the Food and Drug Administration at this time.

Learn more about this and other clinical trials in progress at our practice by calling 800-344-6716.
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